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:: Monk's life ::

 
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praadjarnpaki
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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:00 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote


In addition, monks take hundreds of other vows that regulate many of the activities of daily life. They must behave with decorum at all times, and always respect their superiors. The specifics of meditation practices vary from place to place, but most temple complexes have periods of intensive meditation at prescribed times during the year. There is also usually some form of on-going scholarly study, particularly for apprentice monks.






Monks take on a variety of roles within the monasteries. They conduct religious practices, both internal and for the benefit of the laity, and, with the help of lay volunteers, monks take care of every aspect of running these complex facilities. Monasteries and temples may also serve as educational institutions, which may range from kindergarten to university. At many local temples, together with community members, monks also organize festivals, some of which may require as long as a year to prepare.


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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:00 (2013)    Post subject: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
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praadjarnpaki
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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:00 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote

The alms round itself is a gift that goes both ways.
Daily contact with lay donors reminds the monastics that their practice is not just an individual matter. They are indebted to others for the opportunity to practice,
and should do their best to practice diligently as a way of repaying that debt.
Furthermore, walking through a village early in the morning,
passing by the houses of the rich and poor, the happy and unhappy, gives plenty of opportunities to reflect on the human condition and the need to find a way out of the grinding cycle.
For the donors, the alms round is a reminder that the monetary economy
is not the only way to happiness.
- Thanissaro Bhikkhu, "The Economy of Gifts"


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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:01 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote





Alms Round
For 2,500 years since the time of the Buddha, Buddhist monks have walked the Alms Round. This practice is said to create a field of merit for all sentient beings, an opportunity to show the true qualities of the heart. Freely giving from a generous heart loosens the grip of selfishness. Both donor and recipient are enriched by this practice


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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:01 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote





There is a public benefit to this Buddhist practice of alms round. It is believed that the presence of monastics in society is a sign of blessings and merit (goodness and well being) for the country and its citizens. Making an offering of food during an alms round benefits the donor. It is an opportunity for any person to make an offering and have that offering dedicated to a good cause, whether it be a wish for their well being, or in memory of a loved one or as a prayer or wish for peace, the eradication of poverty, etc. The opportunity to see monks in public is something that many people find encouraging in today’s world. It also serves as a gentle reminder that there are people dedicated to practicing kindness and peaceful living in this world.





It is important to remember that this religious practice is not begging. It involves no solicitation or proselytism of any kind. The monks walk silently in a meditative way ringing a bell, and then chant an alms verse when something is being offered. This verse offers gratitude and blessings for what has been received. In doing an alms round the monks wish not to disrupt the daily routine of the City and its citizens, nor call attention to themselves for any purpose other than to simply perform the traditional alms round quietly and with dignity and then return to their temple.


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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:01 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote

Buddhist monks have a special uniform, their robe. The color of a monk’s robe can tell you what his status in the monastery is. If he wears a brownish orange robe he is considered one of the wise, elderly monks. The color of a monk’s robe is very important. When the ancient Indians looked into the forest they could always tell what leaves were about to fall off the trees because they were yellow, orange or brown. So yellow became the color of renunciation. Now Buddhist monks wear orange, yellow or brown robes as a constant reminder of the importance of not clinging, and of letting go.

Each monks robe has three parts, the outer garment called the tricivara the under garment called the uttarasnga and the cloak called the samghati. Each Buddhist monk is allowed these eight requisites, which includes a begging/alms bowl, a belt, a razor, a staff, a tooth pick and the monks three part robe. A Buddhist monk’s life in a monastery is build around meditation and the study of Buddhist scriptures. Each monastery is a houses a community of monks or nuns who live there permanently.


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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:02 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote

At first, education in Buddhist monasteries was confined to the study of topics on Buddhist Teaching like the basic doctrines, the rules of discipline and the tales of the deeds of the Buddha in His former lives. Gradually, however, Buddhist monastic education became more comprehensive in scope. In the great Buddhist monastic universities of India, students were taught everything from Buddhist and non-Buddhist Philosophy to Grammar and Composition, Logic, Mathematics, and even the Fine Arts.
In an age when education was not yet the responsibility of the state, the Buddhist monastic universities played an important role in providing the people with an education. When Buddhism spread to other parts of Asia, various Buddhist monastic universities were established in China, Tibet and the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Several of these are in existence even to this century.


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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:02 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote

Buddhist monks spend most of their daily life meditating, chanting or making offerings. Monks use meditation to free their mind from passion, aggression, ignorance, jealousy and pride. The art of meditation allows ones natural wisdom to shine through. Monks usually find a quite secluded place to meditate, when a monk meditates; he may sit with his legs crossed or on the lotus position.





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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:03 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote






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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:04 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote

Life and Education in a Buddhist Monastery

When a person wishes to join the Buddhist Order, he is first ordained as a novice. As a symbolic act of his renunciation of the worldly life, he is asked to shave off his hair and put on a robe appropriate to the monastic tradition, which he has entered. The Preceptor, who is a senior monk, then ordains him usually the abbot. The Preceptor and an instructor are then given the responsibility for guiding the novice through his period of monastic training. At the end of this period, the novice may receive the higher ordination as a monk (bhikkhu) or a nun (bhikkuni).

An ordained member of the Order is provided with shelter, food, clothing and medical cares. His life is secure, though not luxurious. His time is spent on the following activities, namely

(1) study, either in groups or individually;
(2) the performance of assigned tasks for the maintenance of the monastic institution;
(3) meditation;
(4) participation in collective observances like the recitation of the disciplinary code on new moon and full moon days;
(5) and the performance of religious services for the lay community.

The amount of time taken up by any one of these activities depends on what the individual member can and wants to do, as well as the nature of the monastic institution that he lives in.

Although members of the Order are subject to the code of discipline and have renounced all but the most basic possessions, they retain the freedom to express their views. The system is highly democratic. Important decisions are normally made collectively and only after all the members have had the opportunity to air their views.

At first, education in Buddhist monasteries was confined to the study of topics on Buddhist Teaching like the basic doctrines, the rules of discipline and the tales of the deeds of the Buddha in His former lives. Gradually, however, Buddhist monastic education became more comprehensive in scope. In the great Buddhist monastic universities of India, students were taught everything from Buddhist and non-Buddhist Philosophy to Grammar and Composition, Logic, Mathematics, Medicine and even the Fine Arts.

In an age when education was not yet the responsibility of the state, the Buddhist monastic universities played an important role in providing the people with an education. When Buddhism spread to other parts of Asia, various Buddhist monastic universities were established in China, Tibet and the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Several of these are in existence even to this century.




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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:06 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote




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PostPosted: Thu 7 Feb - 12:12 (2013)    Post subject: Monk's life Reply with quote





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